Quickies

Quickies: Spiderman, scientific literacy, sorority sisters, and Binding of Isaac

Amanda

Amanda is a science grad student in Boston whose favorite pastimes are having friendly debates and running amok.

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3 Comments

  1. I’ve noticed lately that the biggest indicator of the power of the Patriarchy is that even when our dehumanizing stereotypes are about men, it’s everybody else that has to change their behavior to accommodate us. If we thought Sorority sisters were uncontrollably violent and unable to control their sexual desires, we wouldn’t punish Fraternities by keeping them away. If the frats are so dangerous, maybe they’re the ones that have to be locked up at night.

  2. I got all on the literacy question except 6. My answer was different than the one from #1 and (IMO) my answer was better than his. My answer is that race lines, as we draw them, do not reflect our actual ancestry that we can now prove with molecular analysis.

    Specific example: people from the Middle East are often classified in the same group as Europeans or at least as a closely related race. However, Europeans are roughly 2/3rd central Asian (areas that are now places like Turkmenistan, whose Y chromosome haplotypes are in the European “R” group) and 1/3rd northwest African. Middle Eastern haplotypes and Y chromosomes are ancestrally farther from most Europeans than central Asian people (often grouped with the east Asian “race”) or north African Berber people (often grouped with the sub-Saharan African “race”).

    Why I don’t like his answer: even racists often recognize the intermixing of the races. Also, recent common ancestors does not exclude wide divergence or even speciation. Modern humans seem to be about ten thousand generations old. There is plenty of time for divergence with even mild selection or genetic drift alone.

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