On November 14, 1889, Nellie Bly began her 80-day trek around the world (inspired by the fictional book, of course). She was a pioneering journalist who was also known for infiltrating a women’s asylum in order to expose the barbaric methods inside.

Mary

Mary

Mary Brock is a scientist who works on drugs you've hopefully never heard of. She enjoys cooking to Blue Grass music, messing with her cats, and hosting the Boston Skeptics' Book Club. She was born in the South but loves living in New England (despite the lack of chocolate chip pizza). Mary does not use Twitter and don't even try to follow her, because she is always looking over her shoulder.

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8 Comments

  1. Avatar of vbalbert
    November 14, 2012 at 10:40 am —

    It should be noted that John Reid’s great-nephew was Britt Reid, better known as The Green Hornet.

  2. Avatar of zylla
    November 14, 2012 at 11:14 am —

    I’m torn between shock and rage at the needless, agonizing death of Savita Halappanavar.

  3. Avatar of TheGripester
    November 14, 2012 at 1:57 pm —

    Elizabeth Cochrane (aka “Nellie Bly”) was a great American reporter, whose exposé on insane asylums saved thousands of women unjustly incarcerated, and ensured that those who did belong there were treated humanely. She beat Phileas Fogg by circumnavigating the globe in only 72 days. Then at only 31 years old, she ran a major steel manufacturing plant, developing the now-standard 55-gallon drum, and inventing such items as a stackable garbage can. Later in life, she went back to journalism, covering women’s suffrage, World War I, and tirelessly championing reform of social organizations like adoption agencies. She died of pneumonia at only 57 years old. I’ve always found her life story to be amazing, part of the spirit of hope that came out of that time against great social intertia.

  4. Avatar of criticaldragon1177
    November 14, 2012 at 2:24 pm —

    Mary,

    I actually really enjoyed that story about “the Sun” and the haunted toaster. People will literally believe the strangest things.

  5. Avatar of Jack99
    November 14, 2012 at 3:23 pm —

    Re the “amemones”

    That’s my alma mater! You can tell it was built in the mid seventies by the vivid colour scheme.

    Yes, they screen for promising compounds using cell cultures and there is a long way to go yet. Still, it’s a pretty video – hope it works OK for y’all?

    On a side note, our old prof made his name from his successful technique for liver cell culture. We take such things for granted today, but that was a real breakthrough back then.

  6. Avatar of here_fishy
    November 14, 2012 at 4:02 pm —

    yeah… I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t be swimming in Venice. Granted, it’s been about 15 years since I was there, but when I went on the requisite gondola ride, I’m reasonably certain that I saw a human turd float past..

  7. Avatar of Grand Lunar
    November 14, 2012 at 6:02 pm —

    I can’t hold back: the women who died from being denied a termination really pisses me the fuck off.
    And for what reason, appearently?

    “…and they were told, “this is a Catholic country”.”

    This is why I also get mad when I hear people say the United States is a “christian nation”.
    Because I fear with such mentality, stories like the one from Ireland could happen here in the States, if they haven’t already.

    I have similar thoughts on the study on women that are denied abortions.
    I think, though, that it should have also stated the use of contraceptives as well.
    With all those issues, it really pisses me off to hear the christian right want to deny the right to abortions, contraceptives, as well as reduce social programs that help such women.
    What the fuck is their problem?

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