Quickies

Skepchick Quickies 1.28

Amanda

Amanda is a science grad student in Boston whose favorite pastimes are having friendly debates and running amok.

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23 Comments

  1. To follow up on my comment, I think the only motivation for homophobic US politicians to attempt to prevent the slaughter of gays in Uganda will be if they think that the persecution of gays in Uganda will lead to the granting of asylum to gays from Uganda in the US.

    I think that the idea that the US would grant asylum to gays from Uganda is so inconceivable and so anathema to homophobic US politicians that they can’t even imagine it as a possibility. If it were to become a possibility, I think the amount of pressure that would be brought to bear on Uganda by The Family would be intense.

  2. The article about effective female politicians really made a lot of sense. I experienced something similar in college when I was majoring in chemical engineering. In my class, about a quarter of the students were female. But in the group of “those kids”, the overachievers, the ones you think of first when gossiping about who got the highest grade on a test, that group was a 50/50 split.

    It seemed like there were two groups of people – the really talented ones, and the mediocre but sufficient ones. And those at the top, male and female, were so good that you really just couldn’t deny their ability. But for those in the mediocre group, the men were more likely to be given a pass or given extra chances, but the women were more likely to be judged.

    Yes, I realize that it’s a small group and just an anecdote, but it seems like the problem of sexism hits hardest when average men are competing with average women. I have always felt like I need to be the best just to be on a level playing field with mediocre men.

  3. @daedalus2u: I think you have a good point there…I’ve noticed that people of that persuasion have a hard time seeing the results of their policies or actions.

    Of course, in the long term they may be planning on attempting to do the same in the USA if they get the chance.

  4. @catgirl: It was kinda like all the studies they did on black athletes in baseball after Jackie Robinson. Usually, only the best African-American players would be considered at all on Major League Baseball teams, with backup roles and lesser needed positions always going to white players. It’s definitely not far fetched to consider similar ramifications in gender.

  5. Actually, that article raises a question: does that mean that the election of such people as Michelle Bachmann are suggestive of a breaking down in gender barriers in US politics?

    Could it be that a women can get elected in the US while being just a big of an idiot as the male politicians?

  6. @catgirl: No. It’s not just anecdotal. Any time you do a study of a male dominated/female hostile field of study or work it ends up being that the women who succeed have to be much much better than the men in order to be recognized.

    Gender and IT studies have shown often that women who give a stellar performance are only accepted or promoted at rates equivalent to men who are average or just slightly above average. I’m glad someone is pointing this out about politics but overall I was like “meh” about the article.

  7. I saw the story on Rachel Maddow last night and my heart broke especially because Americans had a hand in the disrespect and antigay movement in that country. What is wrong with people that they would believe a God that they say is loving and the creator of everything would then allow his creation to be tortured and mutilated? That is a God I wouldn’t follow under any circumstances. It certainly isn’t a loving God especially given the fact that he created people that are so hateful and self-righteous.

  8. Heh. When I vote, if I’m in doubt, I lean toward females and Democrats. Actually anywhere I go, I prefer women. My doctor is female, as is my vet, and my dentist. And my masseuse. I’d use a female auto mechanic if I could find one. Maybe being a male gives me an insight into why we can’t be trusted.

  9. @James K

    Actually, that article raises a question: does that mean that the election of such people as Michelle Bachmann are suggestive of a breaking down in gender barriers in US politics?

    Hmmm… Maybe it’s not that women in male-dominated fields have to be “better”, with better defined in the normal ways (smarter, more dedicated, more insightful, better communicative, more organized, etc.). Maybe “better” just means better at the qualities that cause people to excel in a career. In most careers, the qualities I just listed would be “better”. But when it comes to electability, maybe “better” would be things like the ability to incite fear of opponents, encourage moral outrage, and explain away/obfuscate/ignore any facts not fitting the majority of voters’ worldviews without seeming like you are lying.

  10. Wow. I actually seriously considered making myself some mommy cards twenty two years ago when I as floundering around at home with a baby who had medical needs. I was essentially alone after years of working in an office surrounded by people. I started to listen to talk radio just to have a some kind of adult conversation (even if it did involve yelling back at some kind of stupidity!).

    I could never figure out what to put on a card didn’t seem creepy. I guess it was good thing I didn’t.

  11. @homschlr4ever :
    I’ve started considering people that follow that kind of “religion” as followers of Political Christianity, as opposed to the religious version. That version has its own rules and regulations and pretty much ignores the book and messiah they allegedly imitate.

  12. How can we use discrimination as a tool to separate the wheat from the chaff (or the chaff from the super-chaff; the chaff’s the good part, right?), to ensure that we get the best politicians in office?

    Because if we can harness the power of discrimination to create good government, that’s kind of like harnessing the power of stupidity to create diamonds.

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