Quickies

Skepchick Quickies, 11.30

Jen

Jen is a writer and web designer/developer in Columbus, Ohio. She spends too much time on Twitter at @antiheroine.

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11 Comments

  1. I wonder what those naturopaths would be prescribing that requires them to need prescription rights?

    Either they’re shilling useless crap like homeopathy, and they can already “prescribe” that without any problem, as it’s just a “food supplement”, or they want to start prescribing actual medicine, in which case this is just a humongous malpractice lawsuit waiting to happen.

    Either way, I don’t see the point …

    (Unless of course they want whatever they “prescribe” to be refundable by health care, but you can’t have your “food supplement” cake and eat it too you sly snake oil salesfolk …)

  2. It’s true that we have free health care in Canada, and the government picks up the tab for family doctor visits, and hospital stays, as well as any treatments prescribed in-hospital. But we still have to pay for prescription and OTC drugs out of pocket.

    I’d imagine that it has something to do with the fact that insurance will cover a sizable percentage of prescription drugs, and even OTC drugs with a doctors prescription, but will not pay for OTC drugs or supplements without a prescription.

  3. @Peregrine:
    I’d imagine that it has something to do with the fact that insurance will cover a sizable percentage of prescription drugs, and even OTC drugs with a doctors prescription, but will not pay for OTC drugs or supplements without a prescription.

    Could insurance companies opt not to cover prescritions from naturopaths? Or would that be considered discrimination?

  4. @exarch: A lot of plans just mention “prescription drugs”, and unless there’s a specific exemption for preexisting conditions and the like, the insurance company will just run it through the system, and pay out. If it’s just a few bucks here and there, they might just reimburse the patient without bothering to check what it’s for. But I have no idea what the regulations are, or if there’s any exemption for “alternative” or “naturopathic” medicine.

    I should also mention that this legislation is in Ontario, and I’m in New Brunswick, so YMMV.

  5. I think in Belgium, some kinesiologists may practice accupuncture for example, but the visit will simply be reimbursed as a doctor prescribed visit to a specialist, despite the fact the “specialist” is using quackery to treat you.

    Likewise, if a doctor prescribes homeopathy, your visit to the doctor is reimbursed, but the medications themselves usually aren’t reimbursed anyway, whether they’re real or “food supplements”.

    I think accupuncturists are, as of this moment, not yet recognised (and covered) as health care providers.

    The alties are fighting hard for recognition, but they haven’t gotten it yet. But unfortunately, they’re slowly gaining ground …

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