Skepticism

Skepchick Quickies, 12.3

Jen

Jen is a writer and web designer/developer in Columbus, Ohio. She spends too much time on Twitter at @antiheroine.

Related Articles

21 Comments

  1. I think that our teens need to wait until after marriage before having sex with their Television sets. And that goes for adults too! I can understand that some people in this community get hot when they see Hugh Laurie on the TV, but come on, at least use some protection, people!

  2. Now I’m no scientician but it seems pretty clear to me that those babies come about through the will of God, so says the good book of the Almighty. When God finds you ready to bear his belly fruit he will bless you with the seed of life. Dancing only invites the devil into your home and them there picture boxes are the windows Satan uses to spy on the living.

  3. Kudos to Roger Ebert. He gets a lot of flack from film buffs like me, but that was very well-done. And being such a well-written article from someone who is not in the skeptical community but much more in the mainstream, it seems from the comments below that he is actually having a positive effect.

  4. @Steve DeGroof: Indeed. Does this “sexual reproduction theory” explain where the first uterus came from? No it doesn’t! There are holes in it! (In the theory, not in the uterus. Ok, there are holes in the uterus too –or rather openings–, but that’s by design. Intelligent design. What’s good is an uterus with half an opening? Explain that, Darwinists!)

  5. Several times, I had to cover my mouth while reading Ebert’s review of “Expelled.” Otherwise, I would have had to buy a new monitor from all the coffee I sprayed all over it. :-D
    Well done, Roger! Well done!

    In another vein: “Do teens cause TV pregnancies? Find out tonight at 11! “

  6. “American teens lie, steal, cheat at ‘alarming’ rates: study”

    Well, we really can’t blame them. They’re only imitating their elders. Read the recent headlines in the newspaper about Wall Street wheeling and dealing for the details.

  7. @QuestionAuthority: At the gym this morning I was watching the news on one of the TVs and swear one of the crawls said something like, “Teens in danger from media.” It repeated over the course of the 5-minute piece, always referring to some scary “media” that is lurking just around the corner. Shut up, TV news. Just shut up.

  8. @Rebecca: Since all TV is technically “media”, the message “Teens in danger from media” could be dangerous to teens since the message is being transmitted via “the media”. So, maybe teens should ignore that message if they see it on TV? But since the internet is also media, and I’m posting about ignoring “the media” here, maybe ignoring the message is dangerous too! I think I need to go lie down…

  9. In reply to Ebert’s Review: I cringe a little every time someone says “I believe in Evolution.” Truthfully this is usually in a response to the question but at the same time you don’t need to BELIEVE in Evolution. It’s not dogma. We understand it to be true until proven otherwise (not likely). On the face of it it’s a harmless statement, but I think the less we portray the theory of Evolution as dogma (however slightly or subtely) the less we leave it open to battles of belief.

  10. 1. Roger Ebert has saved 90 minutes (or so) of my life (not that I’d ever thought to have seen the movie)

    2. I thought sex caused teen pregnancy. But I might be missing something, I never saw the movie Expelled after all, so what do I know.

    3. If my son (who goes to public school) comes home with (g-d forbid) a “B” or a “C” on his report card, he might get asked if he needs help or if there’s anything mom or dad can do or if he needs a tutor. If religious school kid comes home without a great grade, there’s a chance that he or she might get told they are a useless sinner who is going to he11. I think it encourages one to try to get better grades.

Leave a Reply

You May Also Enjoy

Close
Close