Quickies

Skepchick Quickies 11.4

Amanda

Amanda is a science grad student in Boston whose favorite pastimes are having friendly debates and running amok.

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21 Comments

  1. The Jesus Costume article says that 500 students dressed in costumes.

    [Principal] Broe said too many students were drawn to the [Jesus] costume, and that was reason enough. “Children were [asking], where is the boy who is Jesus Christ?” she said. “It was disrupting the education process.”

    Evidently the first prize for the best costume is a day off.

  2. @Gabrielbrawley
    Sorry, I was making a joke at Rosie O’Donnels expense. She stated on The View months and months ago that 9/11 had to be an inside job because it was the first time in history that fire had melted steel….which came as a shock to all the steelworkers out there. They thought it was fire, but it was actually a combination of dragons breath and fairy dust that melted the steel in the giant forges.

  3. Anyone else find this correlation equals causation research about teen pregnancy from the Rand Corp a little sketchy? Couldn’t these findings just as easily be explained as kids with unrealistic understandings of sexual relationships are drawn to shows with equally unrealistic views of sexual relationships? Stupid is as stupid does? Or is it, stupid does as stupid is?

  4. @PhoebeDog: Is this when Im a Hedge pops in claiming false dichotomy?

    Just kidding, you make a good point. But hey, obviously not watching high-sex shows is good birth control, as I do not watch those shows and I have never been pregnant. Undeniable proof right there. ;)

  5. About the Sexy TV / Teen pregnancy issue:

    I’ve long been a connoisseur of sexy television, and I was pregnant four times as a teenager.

    Also: I am a man.

    What does THAT do to your PRECIOUS survey, eh??

  6. PhoebeDog, that was my concern with it, as well as the self-report aspect which tends to cast doubt on any single set of findings. What TV kids claim they watch, and how much sex they claim they have are not necessarily the same as the truth. But like I say, I don’t mind a flawed study as much as I mind young girls not feeling comfortable talking to their parents, and if the headlines garnered from this study encourage a bit of dialogue then that’s something. I’d like to read the paper, though, to see how they overcome the obvious self-report issues. I believe they are not claiming anything other than a correlation, though. Science journalists have a great habit of mangling research to make snappy headlines.

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