Science

International Polar Year!


The penguins are celebrating. IPY has begun!

Everybody celebrate! The International Polar Year had begun! Through March 2009 (wait a second: isn’t that two polar years? Oh, well… who said Earth Scientists could do math?) Earth Scientists from all over the world will concentrate their efforts on understanding Earth’s polar regions. There will be all kinds of special expeditions, meetings, and collaborative studies focused on better understanding the poles. The start of the IPY is particularly poignant this time round because of the increased focus on and concern about climate change. The poles are very sensitive thermometers for rising global temperatures and are affected much more by climate change than the more temperate equitorial regions.

Personally, I hope this means that there’s a trip to Antarctica in my future… hey, there’s a volcano there.


Mt. Erebus Volcano in Antarctica

Evelyn

Evelyn is a geologist, writer, traveler, and skeptic residing in Cape Town, South Africa with frequent trips back to the US for work. She has two adorable cats; enjoys hiking, rock climbing, and kayaking; and has a very large rock collection. You can follow her on twitter @GeoEvelyn. She also writes a geology blog called Georneys.

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14 Comments

  1. Here's to Erebus being in your future, Evelyn! That would make an interesting contrast to the Indian Ocean / South Pacific.

    Though I suppose parts of Antactica are in the South Pacific. As far south as you can get and still be in the Pacific, anyway. What ocean is Erebus closest to? I'll have to consult Google Earth…

  2. Oh wait, sorry, I had it wrong. The souls were "dumped" AROUND the volcanoes, not in them.

    From that wikipedia link:

    "Xenu is said to have dumped his surplus population around volcanoes, like this one on Hawaii, and blown them up with hydrogen bombs"

  3. Does that mean seawater is in direct contact with the mantle? If not, then what IS in contact with the mantle?

    And wouldn't that cause an extremely cold spot on the mantle (well, cold compared to its average temperature)?

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